Section: TV

'Inland Oceans' from One of Southern Hemisphere's Worst Storms Seen from Space

'Inland Oceans' from One of Southern Hemisphere's Worst Storms Seen from SpaceA deadly cyclone that hit southern Africa left extensive flooding that looked like "inland oceans" in images from space taken just days after the storm made landfall.Sentinel-1, a satellite mission that's part of the European Union's Earth-observation program, Copernicus, captured imagery on March 19 that showed far-reaching floodwaters around Mozambique's town of Beira on the coast of the Indian Ocean.Cyclone Idai could turn out to be "one of the worst weather-related disasters" in the Southern Hemisphere, said Clare Nullis, spokesperson for the World Meteorological Organization.In Mozambique, at least 1,000 people are feared dead and tens of thousands have lost their homes, according to the United Nations, after the cyclone made landfall on March 14, bringing heavy rainfall, a storm surge and strong winds of up to 105 mph (170 km/h). Malawi and Zimbabwe were also severely affected as Idai continued traveling west as a tropical storm. [Earth from Above: 101 Stunning Images from Orbit]Cyclone Idai seen from space on March 13, 2019, west of Madagascar and heading for Mozambique. ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGOHerve Verhoosel of the U.N. World Food Program said that the flooding in Mozambique from above looks like "inland oceans extending for miles and miles."This is a major humanitarian emergency that is getting bigger by the hour," Verhoosel said Tuesday (March 19). According to the Red Cross, 90 percent of Beira, which has a population of about 600,000, has been damaged or destroyed.With communication lines and roads wrecked, rescue efforts have been slow and many people remain cut off from aid.Sentinel-1 is tasked with, in part, mapping flooded areas -- like the recent flooding in the Midwest -- to help relief efforts in such situations.According to the European Space Agency, the images acquired before and after the storm offer immediate information to first responders on the extent of flooding and the location of the affected areas; eventually, that satellite data could also be used to assess environmental and property damage.The first Sentinel-1 satellite launched in 2014, and the second launched in 2016. The pair of polar-orbiting satellites have radar instruments that can "see" in the dark, as well as through clouds and rain.Sentinel-1 has also provided imagery to map flash floods in Laos and to show that an island where the Bangladesh government wants to house Rohingya Muslims is vulnerable to frequent flooding and cyclones. * Rainbow Rivers: See Gorgeous Maps of the World's Waterways * The Strangest Places on Earth (Photos) * Earth's 8 Biggest MysteriesOriginally published on Live Science.


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You Want a Parks and Recreation Revival? Well, This Is What Needs to Happen
Parks and Recreation went off the air in 2015 after seven seasons of Pawnee greatness, and now thanks to Netflix and syndication the NBC comedy is more popular than ever. So, what's it going...
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More Misconceptions about College

More Misconceptions about CollegeNow that we’ve all had a good airing of grievances about elite colleges and their attendant injustices, let’s get some perspective.While the numbers of high-school graduates heading off to college have increased in recent years, the percentages graduating with a four-year degree have not increased much. Many students, especially those who are the first in their families to attend college, drop out before receiving a degree. (They cannot drop out of student-loan payments, though.)Data from the Lumina Foundation show that among Americans aged 25–64, 52.4 percent have no more than a high-school diploma (though 15.4 percent of them attended college for a while). An additional 5.2 percent received a certificate of some kind, and 9.2 percent obtained an associate’s degree. What most people think of when you say “college” is a four-year institution. Only 21.1 percent received bachelor’s degrees, and another 12.2 percent also earned graduate degrees. Adding the last two categories brings the fraction of Americans with college or graduate degrees to just over one-third.While most of the conversation in the past week has focused on highly selective colleges such as Yale and Penn, it’s important to remember that only a small number of America’s colleges are selective. As FiveThirtyEight has reported, more than 75 percent of undergrads attend colleges that accept at least half of all applicants. The number who attend selective colleges -- i.e., schools that accept 25 percent or fewer — is just 4 percent. And the number who attend schools in the very top tier, colleges that reject 90 percent or more, can be counted on your fingers and toes. You can probably guess most of them. (Though not all. On this U.S. News list, Pomona College came in at No. 11, and the Minerva Schools at Keck Graduate Institute came in first.) Less than 1 percent of college students attend these elite schools.Most students attend commuter schools, which tend to be community colleges. Even among those at four-year institutions, almost 25 percent attend part-time. Half of college students are also working, not getting plastered at frat parties.There’s a healthy debate in policy circles about whether our current cultural preoccupation with college for all is a good thing. Some people who are funneled toward college might be a better fit for vocational training, apprenticeships, or other life paths; and while there is no doubt about the association between college completion and higher income, there is uncertainty about the causal relationship.Rather than gnash our collective teeth about whether Jason or Jessica can get into MIT, we might want to focus on all students, those who are headed for college and those who are not. Every student in elementary and high school should be learning about the “success sequence.” The phrase was introduced by Isabel Sawhill and Ron Haskins of the Brookings Institution and has lately been reinforced with a study by W. Bradford Wilcox and Wendy Wang of the Institute for Family Studies.What they’ve found is that students have it within their power to virtually guarantee a middle- or upper-class income if they follow three steps. Those three basics are 1) finish high school, 2) get a full-time job, and 3) get married before having children. Young people who follow all three steps have only a 3 percent likelihood of living in poverty when they reach young adulthood. Eighty-six percent of Millennials who put marriage first had incomes in the middle or upper third, compared with 53 percent who had children before marriage. The success sequence works for those born into poverty, too. Seventy-one percent of Millennials who grew up in the bottom third of the income distribution were in the middle or upper third by young adulthood if they followed the three steps. Among African Americans, 76 percent who followed the success sequence achieved the middle class or above, and among Hispanics, the percentage was 81 percent.With all of the emphasis on a tiny sliver of the top 1 percent of students, most young people can get the impression that they are doomed to a lesser life. In fact, avoiding a few pitfalls like dropping out of high school, having a baby out of wedlock, and failing to find employment is a ticket to success.There’s a bias among writer types to pay attention to Princeton and Columbia. But that’s not really where the action is in helping most Americans.© 2019 Creators.com


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Booker nets 1st 2020 endorsement from S. Carolina lawmaker

Booker nets 1st 2020 endorsement from S. Carolina lawmakerCOLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Democratic presidential candidate Cory Booker has netted the first endorsement from a sitting lawmaker in the crucial early-voting state of South Carolina.


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Facebook Stopped Bangladeshi Ad Farm Targeting Utah in Midterms

Facebook Stopped Bangladeshi Ad Farm Targeting Utah in MidtermsPolitical news in a Utah congressional district wasn’t coming from inside the U.S. -- a mismatch Facebook had tuned its software algorithms to detect. A data scientist in the election-monitoring center at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, California, inspected the activity manually and discovered, at 11:47 a.m., that the source spreading the content was an ad farm in Bangladesh. The slides, viewed by Bloomberg News, show in detail how Facebook has improved its process for rooting out bad actors using tactics similar to those Russian operatives used in 2016.


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WRAPUP 3-Indonesian airline cancels Boeing order, citing passenger fear
JAKARTA/OSLO, March 22 (Reuters) - Indonesian airline Garuda plans to cancel a $6 billion order for Boeing 737 MAX jets, it said on Friday, saying some passengers would be frightened to board the plane after two fatal crashes, although analysts said th...
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Republicans' silence over Trump's attacks on McCain is truly shameful

Republicans' silence over Trump's attacks on McCain is truly shamefulThe mealy-mouthed responses of the late senator’s former colleagues demonstrates the extent to which Trump has recast the party in his own imageJohn McCain was brutalized in captivity in Vietnam for his sense of duty and honor. Photograph: ABC Photo Archives/Getty ImagesIn death as he was in life, John S McCain is an American patriot and hero, regardless of what Donald Trump may think or say. As the Vietnam war raged, McCain was held for five years as a prisoner of war at the so-called Hanoi Hilton. Rather than trade on his family’s connections – his father and grandfather served as navy admirals – the young McCain elected to stay with his fellow prisoners, and was brutalized for his sense of duty and honor.While Trump’s nonstop effort to mar the late senator’s memory should surprise no one, the response of McCain’s Republican Senate colleagues to Trump’s posthumous onslaught is both telling and disgraceful. The barons of the Senate live in fear of the president and his base. When Trump told Iowans in early 2016 that he could stand on New York’s Fifth Avenue “and shoot somebody” and still not lose voters, he knew of what he spoke.Senator Lindsey Graham, McCain’s “best friend” and a naval reserve officer, is the most obvious case in point. Graham would only offer up tweeted mush in defense of his one-time “Amigo”: “As to @SenJohnMcCain and his devotion to his country: He stepped forward to risk his life for his country, served honorably under difficult circumstances, and was one of the most consequential senators in the history of the body.” We are comforted.Sign up to receive the latest US opinion pieces every weekdayLater, Graham told reporters, “I think the president’s comments about Senator McCain hurt him more than they hurt the legacy of Senator McCain. I’m going to try to continue to help the president.” We know you are.Graham continued, “My job is to represent the people of South Carolina. They want me to work with the president where I can. I’ve gotten to know the president. We have a good working relationship. I like him.” In other words, Graham is scared silly of Palmetto State Republicans.And yet politically, who can blame Graham for going full weasel?The polls tell the story, namely that embrace of Trump is a surefire way to defuse a prospective GOP primary. To illustrate, in 2017 Graham had one of the highest disapproval ratings in his home state of any senator, 40%. By January 2019, Graham’s disapproval numbers had dropped to 32%.Playing Trump’s hatchet man at the Kavanaugh confirmation clearly paid off for Graham, and with McCain lying soundly in the grave, their friendship could lie there too. Said differently, if Graham could stand idly by as Trump trashed McCain, it was a green light for others to do the same.> McSally offered up the same anodyne gruel as McConnell, heaping praise upon the late senator, without mentioning Trump’s conductTake Mitch McConnell, the Senate majority leader. McConnell gushed: “It was a blessing to serve alongside a rare patriot and genuine American hero in the Senate.” On the other hand, not a word about the president’s posthumous offensive.Ditto the Arizona senator Martha McSally, who filled the vacant Senate seat left by McCain. McSally offered up the same anodyne gruel as McConnell, heaping praise upon the late senator, without mentioning Trump’s conduct: “John McCain is an American hero and I am thankful for his life of service and legacy to our country and Arizona.” For the record, the names Graham, McConnell and McSally will each appear on the November 2020 ballot.By contrast, two senators who won’t be running for re-election are Georgia’s Johnny Isakson and Utah’s Mitt Romney. Isakson faces the voters in 2022, Romney is newly elected, and their distance from the ballot box showed.Isakson called Trump out by name: “The McCain family deserves better, I don’t care if he’s president of United States, owns all the real estate in New York, or is building the greatest immigration system in the world.” For good measure, Isakson later labeled Trump’s comments “deplorable”.As for Romney, he posited this rhetorical question: “I can’t understand why the president would, once again, disparage a man as exemplary as my friend John McCain: heroic, courageous, patriotic, honorable, self-effacing, self-sacrificing, empathetic, and driven by duty to family, country, and God.” No other Senate Republicans have come close to seconding Isakson or Romney.As for decorum, it didn’t make a difference in 2016, and don’t expect it to make a difference now. The bottom line is that Trump has recast the Republican party in his own image. He embodies and channels the party’s core – not McConnell in his banker’s shirts. As Trump sees it, and the Senate GOP tacitly acknowledges, without the president the GOP would probably be lost.


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Indonesia's Garuda says to cancel 49-jet Boeing 737 deal after crashes
Indonesia's national carrier Garuda has told Boeing it will cancel a multi-billion-dollar order for 49 Boeing 737 Max 8 jets after two fatal crashes involving the plane, in what is thought to be the first formal cancellation for the model. "We have se...
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Indonesia's Garuda says to cancel 49-jet Boeing 737 deal after crashes
Indonesia's national carrier Garuda has told Boeing it will cancel a multi-billion-dollar order for 49 Boeing 737 Max 8 jets after two fatal crashes involving the plane, in what is thought to be the first formal cancellation for the model. "We have se...
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Bringing the Sting: The U.S. Navy Is Getting New F/A-18E/F Super Hornets
The Super Hornets would be the first new-build examples of the Block III variant of the F/A-18E/F. The Block III flies farther and carries more weapons than an older F/A-18E/F can do and also is stealthier than earlier Super Hornet models are.
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