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Cops: Ammo, manifesto seized in school shooting suspect home

Cops: Ammo, manifesto seized in school shooting suspect homeSPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Guns, ammunition, a Molotov cocktail and a school yearbook with pictures of faces marked with X's were seized by police from the home of a Washington state high school sophomore accused of fatally shooting a classmate and wounding three other students, according to court documents filed in the case.


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The 9 Worst Travel Trends of All Time
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Three dead, 16 hurt after buses collide in New York City
Three people were killed and at least 16 injured when a New York City transit bus and a tour bus collided early on Monday in the city's borough of Queens, spinning around before slamming into a building, fire officials said. Firefighters pulled passen...
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12 Next-Level Sesame Chicken Recipes
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Climate change not as threatening to planet as previously thought, new research suggests

Climate change not as threatening to planet as previously thought, new research suggestsClimate change poses less of an immediate threat to the planet than previously thought because scientists got their modelling wrong, a new study has found. New research by British scientists reveals the world is being polluted and warming up less quickly than 10-year-old forecasts predicted, giving countries more time to get a grip on their carbon output. An unexpected “revolution” in affordable renewable energy has also contributed to the more positive outlook. Experts now say there is a two-in-three chance of keeping global temperatures within 1.5 degrees above pre-industrial levels, the ultimate goal of the 2015 Paris Agreement. They also condemned the “overreaction” to the US’s withdrawal from the Paris Climate Accord, announced by Donald Trump in June, saying it is unlikely to make a significant difference. We're in the midst of an energy revolution and it's happening faster than we thoughtProfessor Michael Grubb, University College London According to the models used to draw up the agreement, the world ought now to be 1.3 degrees above the mid-19th-Century average, whereas the most recent observations suggest it is actually between 0.9 to 1 degree above. The discrepancy means nations could continue emitting carbon dioxide at the current rate for another 20 years before the target was breached, instead of the three to five predicted by the previous model. “When you are talking about a budget of 1.5 degrees, then a 0.3 degree difference is a big deal”, said Professor Myles Allen, of Oxford University and one of the authors of the new study. Published in the journal Nature Geoscience, it suggests that if polluting peaks and then declines to below current levels before 2030 and then continue to drop more sharply, there is a 66 per cent chance of global average temperatures staying below 1.5 degrees. The goal was yesterday described as “very ambitious” but “physically possible”. Another reason the climate outlook is less bleak than previously thought is stabilising emissions, particularly in China. A revolution in renewable energy has improved the picture Credit: PA Renewable energy has also enjoyed more use than was predicted. China has now acquired more than 100 gigawatts of solar cells, 25 per cent of which in the last six months, and in the UK, offshore wind has turned out to cost far less than expected. Professor Michael Grubb, from University College London, had previously described the goals agreed at Paris in 2015 as “incompatible with democracy”. But yesterday he said: "We're in the midst of an energy revolution and it's happening faster than we thought, which makes it much more credible for governments to tighten the offer they put on the table at Paris." He added that President Trump’s withdrawal from the agreement would not be significant because “The White House’s position doesn’t have much impact on US emissions". “The smaller constituencies - cities, businesses, states - are just saying they’re getting on with it, partly for carbon reduction, but partly because there’s this energy revolution and they don’t want to be left behind.” At a glance | Paris climate accord The new research was published as the Met Office announced that a “slowdown” in the rate of global temperature rises reported over roughly the first decade of this century was now over. The organisation said the slowdown in rising air temperatures between 1999 and 2014 happened as a result of a natural cycle in the Pacific, which led to the ocean circulation speeding up, causing it to pull heat down in the deeper ocean away from the atmosphere. However, that cycle has now ended. Claire Perry, the climate change and industry minister, claimed Britain had already demonstrated that tackling climate change and running a strong economy could go “hand in hand”. “How is the time to build on our strengths and cement our position as a global hub for investment in clean growth,” she said.


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Are Nicole Kidman's Scientologist children forbidden to speak to her? Emmys speech leads to speculation

Are Nicole Kidman's Scientologist children forbidden to speak to her? Emmys speech leads to speculationNicole Kidman's impassioned acceptance speech was one of the highlights of the Emmys -- but careful listeners noticed something both telling and troubling.


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Family Wants Answers After Georgia Tech Police Kill LGBTQ Campus Leader
Family members of Georgia Tech student Scout Schultz say they plan to file a civil rights lawsuit after the 21-year-old was fatally shot by campus police on Saturday night.
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Israel gets first joint US military base
Israel on Monday inaugurated with its US ally a joint missile defence base on Israeli soil, the first ever, a senior Israeli air force officer said. The new facility, at an undisclosed location in southern Israel, was announced as Israeli Prime Minist...
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Family Of Chicago Teen Found Dead In Hotel Freezer Demands FBI Investigation

Family Of Chicago Teen Found Dead In Hotel Freezer Demands FBI InvestigationFamily and friends of Kenneka Jenkins, a teenager found dead last week in the freezer of a Chicago-area hotel, want the FBI to investigate after local police said they don’t suspect foul play.


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France opens door to post-2025 talks on Iran nuclear deal
France warned Monday that salvaging the Iran nuclear deal was "essential," but left the door open to further talks to ward off any US threat to walk away from the landmark agreement. "France will try to persuade President Trump of the importance of th...
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